What I like the most about looking at the stars

 

As I have told you before, I am an amateur astronomer because I love looking at planets, the Saturn rings, the moon, and virtually any celestial body that I come across. My passion has been fueled by many years of study as I haven’t had the chance to dive into the topic while I was in high school. I didn’t have any subjects that could delve into the complexity of the topic nor were any teachers available for consultation in this sense. In other words, I had to research everything on my own.

The first thing that I remember was that I used to sit up late at night and look at the sky from the window of my room. My parents had no idea that I would sit up so late and that was why I always woke up tired in the morning.

I was fortunate enough to live in an attic room, so stargazing was pretty easy. I saved some money from the meager cents that my parents used to spare so that I could buy snacks to nibble on. Instead, I saved them all and bought my first telescope. Thanks to the design of my room, I was able to use it even in the dark and even through the attic window.

Once in a while, I would start asking myself why I was so fascinated by the universe. I did a little research on the topic online, but couldn’t find any answer that would satisfy me. Some people simply say that we’re attracted to the stars because they’re beautiful and unreachable, much like a love lost forever. Others say that the stars are like muses that help them have nice dreams and sleep better if they take the time to look at the sky several minutes every evening, before going to sleep.

Researchers from the University of California-Irvine have found that people who like stargazing are more helpful, altruistic, and have an overall positive social behavior. Otherwise said, looking at the stars can help you become kinder and perhaps assist you in better understanding the world around you and the people that you generally come in contact with on a regular basis.

The last likelihood for my fascination that I feel the need to mention belongs to Cornell Astronomy. A web page from 2015 details the fact that stargazing is like taking a peek at your own past because the light that we now see reflected in those celestial bodies might just as well be from thousands and thousands of years before. Those stars might very well not exist any longer, which makes my hobby even dreamier.

Author: Jonathan Milnus